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Hole #11

White Dogwood
Cornus florida
Par 4, 455 Yards

At this hole begins Amen Corner, and wind is often a factor. A pond guards the green to the left and a bunker strategically placed in the right-center. This hole has decided all but one Masters sudden death playoff and may best be remembered for Larry Mize's incredible chip shot in 1987.

Tee shot is out of narrow chute to open fairway. Approach from the right gives better view of green, which has water on the left. Green has been raised 2 feet, which should affect some pitch shots. Two bunkers behind green replaced by one bunker.

Tee shot is out of narrow chute to open fairway. Approach from the right gives better view of green, which slopes toward the water on the left.

The first of the water holes. Most golfers play their second shot to the right for the edge of the green or beyond trusting to a long putt or a chip shot to get close enough for par.

 
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Jack Nicklaus says: Hit it as hard as you can off the tee. I prefer the right side a little bit. I think I have more of an angle in down the length of the green. I never shoot at the pin along the left side because the green slopes and pitches to the left. Even if I miss the green to the right I don't mind that. It shouldn't be a difficult pitch. It's always better than dropping for your third shot and pitching for four.

Like the previous two holes, the 11th was a key hole for me in 1986. I hit a big tee shot, then put an 8-iron 25 feet past the flagstick. I was paired with Sandy Lyle, who had the same line and I played my putt just inside his coin, which ended up being a perfect read. The ball dropped for my third birdie in a row. The 11th hole has changed considerably since then. The right side has been taken away a little bit on the tee shot because of the second cut of grass. Iíve always liked to drive the ball down the right side because a tee shot into that area gives you a better angle into the green. You can also bounce the ball into the green from there. The water on the left is an obvious no-no, so it has been a green where Iíve always aimed for the front right. Changes to the putting surface have made pitching from the right side more difficult. Now, my tee shot dictates how bold I get with the approach. You have to be really careful here or youíll walk away with a big number. No. 11 is the start of Amen Corner and you really have to focus on the business at hand. Larry Mizeís 140-foot chip-in to defeat Greg Norman in sudden death in 1987 is one of the most memorable shots in Masters history.

Fuzzy Zoeller says: This is a hell of a par 4 which a straight, big fairway. Just behind the water is a pine tree, and that should be your target. The green is one of the fastest putts at Augusta. You want to try to stay to the right.

Tiger Woods says: (Before 1998), they put in a new tee box, moved a little bit further to the right because some of the longer hitters now are driving it to where they have wedges in their hands. So now we have to contend the with trees on the right and hit a fade off the tee. The green is very firm. Anything right of the pin is good; anything left is normally in the water. You have to be very careful because the wind swirls.

Fred Couples says: This is a great, great hole. It's another hole where I swing very hard with a driver and try to get it down there as far as I can. There's a pond to the left and it's a very delicate second shot -- a lot of bailout to the right -- and once you do that you're left with a tough little chip. When the course is dry, it's not really a hard hole. But when the course is wet and you're hitting a 6-iron to the green, it's a great second shot. That's THE flattest green. It slopes from the right to the left toward the water, but as long as you're not 50 feet away it's not that difficult unless they put the pin right on the very front. I remember last year guys were three-putting. Every other guy three-putted if he hit it past the hole. The pin was in a bad spot.

Bernhard Langer says: Players have always debated whether it's better to drive down the left or the right side of No. 11. If you go down the left side, you have a little flatter fairway but your approach is over the pond. If you go down the right side, you catch a bit more downslope but may have a tougher lie for your second shot. The more I play the hole, the more I think it's better down the right side. That way I can just aim at the right half of the green. Ideally, I want to be left of the hole for an uphill putt, but that can be hard to do. I didn't have to worry about putting on Saturday in 1993. I chipped in after seeing Russ Cochran miss a putt on 12 that would have tied me for the lead. That was a big birdie for me because it increased my lead in a situation where I would have been very happy with par. Hole 11 features several changes this year, but they won't come into play often. Heading the list: Both back bunkers were removed and replaced with a single, larger one back right, and Rae's Creek was widened and brought closer to the back-left edge of the green. Now, any ball hit long and left will wind up in the water.

 

Hole #11

White Dogwood
Cornus florida

Cornus florida is one of the most popular flowering trees native to the Eastern U.S. The flowers, which bloom in late March and early April, are followed by shiny red berries in August and colorful foliage in the fall, making it the aristocrat of flowering trees in southern landscapes.

 

 


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